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Motorcycle Auction Yearbook 2020

If you are passionate about vintage motorcycles or you work in this field, if you care about motorcycles in general and your own collection in particular, if you are interested in a tool that can help you enhance and increase your knowledge, if you like to be updated on what happens in the world of motorcycle collecting, we have what you need.
The Motorcycle Auction Yearbook 2020 is a long term project that provides for the annual publication of a volume in which will be collected in-depth data of motorcycles offered for sale in international auctions, complete with reserve and award prices in major currencies.
Having this book in your hands it would mean to be more informed about the evolution of the international motorcycle collecting sector and have a glance at the overview of what is happening in the sales of motorcycle all over the world.
This book, first of its kind, is a 264 pages volume published only in English.
It contains 3480 records of all motorbikes sold by major auction houses held from January 1st to December 31st 2020.
Financial Market Overview
Several charts about collectibles, insurances, currency rates, inflation data and interviews about the 2020 market.
Statistics
New statistics to help interpret the market, such as numbers of motorcycles auctioned per brand, displacement, FIVA classes and manufacturing nations.
Best Sales
Details of the top 50 sales of the year.
Results of the year 2020
An extensive, accurate and detailed listing of 3480 motorcycles offered at auction throughout the year sorted by make in alphabetical order and then by year of construction.

Motorcycle Auction Yearbook 2020

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INTERVIEWS

Alberto Sella

THE ANCIENT TRADITION OF MECHANICS

03/01/2020

Boris Fantechi

THE ROUTES EXPERT

03/01/2020

Donato Benetti

The passion for motorcycles has to be shared!

03/01/2020

Stefano Vertua

The motorcyclist with a passion for tractors
27.02.2021

Daniele Pescali

Blue Wasp

05.05.2021

Matteo Pettinari

HONDA Rider

05.05.2021

Loris Gosetto

The rider

08.06.2021

ENRICO BONETTI

BLACK BMW

31.08.2021

ENRICO FARINA

THE ENDURO RIDER

07.09.2021

GIANGALEAZZO RAPAZZINI

The ACCOUNTANT

11.10.2021

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Alberto Sella

THE ANCIENT TRADITION OF MECHANICS
3.01.2020

We’re interviewing Alberto Sella, who worked for over 43 years in hi family-owned Banking Group and coordinates along with his sons a family office in Lugano, Switzerland.

When and why did you start collecting?
I consider myself a mechanic and it might sound weird, but I like to think that I come from a family of mechanics. Most of my cousins had lathe machines at home and we’re all always been kind of mechanically obsessed. In fact, all of my family, me included, buys motorcycles for the pleasure of riding and preservation, and never to resell for financial gain. I had 3 phases in my collecting years: the first was between the ages of 12 and 15 and it started with a moped, then evolved to more powerful motorcycles that I frequently used in my travels. The second phase started around when I was 25-26 and even though I was part of a motorcycle club in Biella, Italy, I sold all of my motorcycles in one go. At 40, I returned to motorcycles by buying a Honda 400 Four, then my son was born, so I sold it to a colleague, who actually gifted it back to me many years later. Sadly, I sold that 400 Four and I regret it to this day since that motorcycle was the one that renewed my passion for motorcycles. From then I started to get close to the BMW world since I needed reliable motorcycles for my travels. Initially I bought a BMW 650 then with time I switched to higher displacements. The last one I bought is a BMW 1’200 that I intend to keep since is one of the last models still with an air-cooling system.

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle? If yes, to who?
Usually, I’m very jealous of my motorcycles but I gifted my son a Husqvarna. We then bought together a BMW 80 ST at a fair in Manheim that we’re restoring together. I believe motorcycles have a soul and know the type of person by their maneuverability and care. I have to confess, in the evening I like to go to my garage and caress them, each night a different one so they don’t get jealous.

Do you think the collector, even if collecting mainly for himself/herself, has a social role?
I can’t say for sure there is a social role, is the passion for these masterpieces that I’d like to see in other motorcycle enthusiasts. I think that buying motorcycles is different than buying other type of goods. As I previously said in my family many were experienced mechanics. Riccardo Sella, one of my two sons, founders of Banca Sella, had a lathe machine so big it could only be used in the living room. It was actually used to turn an old Harley-Davidson engine to a functioning airplane!

Does your collection include memorabilia?
More than memorabilia i like to collect everything regarding the motorcycles I own, like the first license plate, books and other documents.

Do you only collect motorcycles?
In a period of my life, I collected manuscripts and antique books, as many in my family did. We then all decided to start a foundation to which we donated all of our collection.

To which motorcycle are you most connected, and why?
The BMW R80GS first series I bought when it came out in 1981. Several years later I sold it and then bought the same model that belonged to the famous motocross pilot, Belgian Gaston Rahier, famous for his participations at the Paris Dakar races.

In your opinion, which one is the most beautiful motorcycle ever built?
The 1969 Triumph Bonneville T120, motorcycle I had, then sold, and never had a chance to bought it back.

If you had to buy a new production motorcycle, which one would you choose?
Probably a Ducati. I rode a blue and gold livery Ducati 125 Sport that I bought in 1962. During that time, it was the only model with a cam shaft and permitted higher revolutions per minute. I had to change its engine twice a year and I remember keeping all old parts in my room and my mom scolding me. I remember there was a Turismo version, way finer than the Sport version and very beautiful. If I remember correctly that’s the first motorcycle Giacomo Agostini used at the beginning of his career.

Do you have any experts you refer to when needed?
I often go to a mechanic from Monza around my age who worked for a long time at BMW and is very renowned in Switzerland and Scandinavian for his ‘angelic’ work. After the motorcycles go through his magic hands you look at them and the light up. Now that I think about it, I had a beautiful black BMW R69 S with gold detailing.

In your opinion, does a motorcycle collection have a role in the current socio-economic climate?
I really like electronic-free motorcycles which testifies to the fact I can hear their souls and rumble while working on them.

A ‘beautiful and unattainable’ motorcycle you wish was in your collection?
I have to repeat myself because the most beautiful motorcycle remains the 1969 Triumph Bonneville T120. Without doubt in 200 years if a kid asked his father what’s the most good-looking motorcycle ever, he would show the picture of a Bonneville T120.

An adjective or phrase you would use to define your collection?
Since they represent different phases of my life every time I use one of my old motorcycles it reminds me of the good old times. I still remember when I bought my Moto Guzzi Falcone, at the time was the most powerful on the market and used by the police. To better explain: that’s a motorcycle that goes 120 km/h pushing to the max downhill.

Since you worked for many years at your family-owned bank, you qualify as a finance expert. Is investing in motorcycles a good investment?
I’m sure it is. The motorcycle market is growing and I believe it can evolve more such as the classic cars market.

How do you choose your motorcycles?
Do you use experts, websites or other means? I frequent markets and fairs in various countries. There’s a fair specifically in Manheim, Germany, which is one of the biggest in the world. Everytime I go there there’s to go crazy with how many models you can find, even sold for pieces or as restoration projects.

Where will your collection go when you’re gone?
I hope it goes to my sons, Lorenzo and Alessandro, the latter being already passionate about motorcycles.

Even if you’ve been living in Lugano for many years, you’re originally from Biella, in Italy. Is there any suggestion as to where to go when visiting?
Yes, i lived my first 37 years in Biella and i suggest a panoramic route through the mountains, the Zegna route where you can see the Monte Rosa massif. On foot it takes 3 hours to get in Val d’Aosta, a place with gorgeous landscapes and genuine trattorie. When you get to the top of the mountains on the other side you can see the sea.

BORIS FANTECHI

THE ROUTES EXPERT

3.01.2020

When and why did you start collecting?

I started as a motorcycle rider, which defines me to my core, and it’s easier to start this adventure if you’re already a passionate biker, also because motorcycling is a multifaceted activity, that extends to more branches, and so you find yourself adding and adding motorcycles that cover various activities. I started in 1984 because that year I found myself owning two motorcycles. My Triumph Bonneville, forever my ride and still in my possession, and a Ducati 900 S2.

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle? If yes, to whom?

Yes, I had a Honda 750 Four that my friend Fabio Drigo wanted to buy but couldn’t since it was registered in Firenze, Italy, and at that time it was too complicated to bring it in Switzerland. So I decided to gift it to a friend from Verona because I wanted him to participate in our motorcycle races. Why does anyone gift motorcycles? It’s because it is an adventure buddy, that accompanies you everywhere, that’s why!

Even though a collector mainly collects for himself, do you think a collection has a social role?

I think so, and I’d love for other collectors to think this way. I consider motorcycle collecting a way to add friends. Riding motorcycles is a way of living and collecting means to grow your sphere with new adventure partners, new travels and new experiences.

Does your collection include memorabilia?

Yes, of course, and I think this is an interesting question. To motorcycles there’s a series of objects, clothing, medals, photographs and many other items and tools. It’s a combination of various iconic elements, that become part of your history and personality as well as your motorcycles.

Do you collect only motorcycles?

Like many kids my age I was an avid stamp collector, and as a matter of fact my mom is moving and found my old stamp collection. I also had a fairly large collection of slides to watch under a microscope, which I used a lot to observe slides of plants and rocks. I think passion for collecting started from there.

To which motorcycle are you most attached to and why?

Honestly the first. I’ve had my Triumph Bonneville for as long as I can remember, and it has become part of my skeleton.

In your opinion, which one is the most beautiful motorcycle ever built?

This is a good question that requires more reflection. I’m going to list four, so I don’t have to choose. One is right in front of me, the Ducati 916. Others are the Vincent, the BSA Goldstar and the Honda RC30, my secret favourite.

If you had to buy a new production motorcycle, which one would you choose?

It always depends on the passion you have for different types of motorcycle, which is linked to an emotional sensation that I think a well-produced motorcycle should give. Today a brand that thrills me is KTM.

Are there any experts or magazines that you consult to help you choose the motorcycles you buy?

Yes, I’m subscribed to five magazines, of which I have every number. Magazines are fundamental because they provide important information about new motorcycles, meetings and contact information of many experts in various fields that you can consult when needed. The first is the German Das Motorrad, followed by Classic Bike Magazine and others.

A ‘beautiful and unattainable’ motorcycle you’d love to own?

Surely the Honda RC30.

An adjective or phrase to describe your collection?

I’d define it as ample, because it manages to contain many of the brands I love and since it’s mine and I can use all the motorcycles every time I want to.

In your opinion, what role does a motorcycle collection have in today’s socio-economic environment?

I consider myself as an epic collector, of which the main motivation is emotion, while the monetary side is secondary. One thing is sure: collecting is expensive. By using your motorcycles you have operating costs, but I am of the opinion that every ride in your collection should be used. For example, at the Birmingham Museum 7-8 mechanics test the motorcycles in its collection to ensure the proper care to administer.

In your opinion, is the investment in motorcycles a good investment?

Right now, you’d be at loss. I have to be honest, if you want to sell your collection today, you’d find yourself in trouble. We can take Museo Morbidelli as an example, despite being supported by many parties it couldn’t be sold at a price suitable for a collection of that magnitude. As a dear friend of mine often says: ‘That’s a buyer’s market’.

Where will your collection go when you’re gone?

i’d love for some to go to specific people in my life, guaranteeing my motorcycles immortality. Other will simply be sold by my family and I’d like for them to have a new life.

You’ve been living in Lugano, Switzerland for many years. Do you have any trails to suggest?

I have so many to suggest. I can mention my website, www.motogiro.com, where I try to publish every event and trails I come to know. One trail that comes to mind is the one that goes by Val d’Intelvi, Italy, then down to Lake Como then coming back in Switzerland through Chiasso and continuing to the valleys of Canton of Valais, holder of beautiful panoramas.

Donato Benetti

The passion for motorcycles has to be shared!
3.01.2020

When and why did you start collecting?

Started something like 20 years ago. A friend in 80s had a BMW K 100 RS and was making trips of international tourism around many countries and I always envied this since I didn’t have the means to have all that, so I always had this great German model in my mind. Years later I started to find my first BMWs 50/5 in a basement in Brescia, started to grow my collection and looking after it. That’s when my passion started.

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle? If yes, to whom?

I never actually gifted a motorcycle. But I gifted the restauration to a friend and member of my motorcycle club, Miriam Orlandi. She took a solitary trip through America, from Alaska to Argentina, for several months, with a BMW R 100 and even wrote a book about it. After this lengthy trip the motorcycle clearly had some problems, so she abandoned it at her parents’ house, I decided to take it to my garage and gift the restauration of this motorcycle with such an interesting story, which looks amazing with all the rest of my collection. Will be giving the motorcycle back in pristine condition in the next few months.

Does the collector, even if collects mainly for himself/herself, has a social role?

Absolutely. To spread and preserve the culture which is not only connected to an object. I believe that a motorcycle, like cars, paintings, books and everything about our past lives represents our history. Collecting motorcycles means care, share and preserve a culture that identifies with important motorcycle brands, many not in business anymore, of which collecting certain models testifies the existence of a past no more with us.

Does your collection include memorabilia?

I’m fond of memorabilia, especially vintage petrol pumps and signs, poster ads, mainly from the 50s and from cars and motorcycles brands. I have a couple Shell petrol pumps, one of Esso and some very big signs that old Esso gas stations used to hang at the service stations and casually found them in the countryside of Cremona. Farmers there used the signs for covering the food for the farm animals. I paid a farmer that dug them out with a tractor, I cleaned and fixed them like my motorcycles. And to think that a couple years back a sign just like the ones I have was sold at auction for 15000 euros. The satisfaction comes not from the money side but from finding them in this lost place. Now the signs are shown at my garage.

Do you collect only motorcycles?

I actually have some cars too. I can’t afford to collect also cars, which also need ample space to properly store them. I had a couple of Porsche 911 Targa, I sold one and I kept the 1985 that I knew perfectly because the last owner was a friend. Moreover, I share with a great friend a cars collection, which he owns, but not having time to care for them I took the job and regularly check on them. We participated together in a lot of classic cars competitions around the world, the last being in Pebble Beach, California.

To which motorcycle are you most attached and why?

In reality it’s two. The absolute first, forever my dream, a 1985 BMW R 80 G/S Paris-Dakar. A dear friend of mine had it and I bought it when he died. Other than being a fascinating motorcycle it keeps alive the memory of this person I really cared for. The second one it’s the BMW, made by Silvio Fatichi and used by pilot Bruno Birbes at the Pharaons Rally in Egypt and Paris-Dakar in 1987.

In your opinion, what’s the best motorcycle ever built?

Being a BMW fan, I’d say two: the BMW Gaston Rahier won with at the Paris-Dakar; the other one is the BMW G/S which various pilots used, coordinated by the engineer Laszlo Peres, at the ISD, the Enduro Six-Days, 1979 and 1980 and the ISDE 1981.

If you had to buy a new production motorcycle, which one would it be?

I’m heavily connected to BMW, mostly by passion and even I don’t disdain other iconic and famous brands I’d buy a 1250 GS. Even though for the use I have, long trips included, 1980s BMWs are more trustworthy because of their mechanics, which I understand and can work with. As famously said: ‘If it isn’t there, it can’t break’, so I feel comfortable and confident working with motorcycles with no complicated technology.

Are there experts or magazines you use to fine your choices?

I mostly rely on experts that know the history of the brand and know pilots and engineers that used and worked on the motorcycles. I contact often Stefano Vaccari, engineer from Modena, who made my BMW replica that I use for Enduro Vintage races. He knows every BMW pilots and engineers that directly worked on this type of motorcycles and I think I can’t have a better source than him.

A ‘beautiful and impossible’ motorcycle you want in your collection?

I’m chasing this motorcycle for a while, but the current owner doesn’t want to sell it, and it’s the official motorcycle engineer Laszlo Peres used in 1979 at The Six Days of Siegen, Germany. This is the motorcycle my replica is based on but I’d love to have the original in my collection.

An adjective or phrase you would use to define your collection?

It’s my spiritual sanctuary.

You’re a finance expert working for a large insurance group, is investing in motorcycles a good investment?

If I want to give an example, a good portion of my assets was used to build my collection, so I would say for sure that yes, it is a good investment.

How do you choose a motorcycle for your collection? Who do you consult and where do you do your research? Do you frequent exhibitions or events? If yes, is there an event you wouldn’t ever miss?

In Italy the most important is the Novegro in Milan. At this market-fair there are exhibitions not only from professionals but also private collectors, and more often than not those collections contain interesting and rarely seen motorcycle mostly found in basements or inherited from family members.

Who will care for your collection when you’re gone?

I have two daughters more interested in shoes and bags more than motorcycles, of course. One of my daughters is interested in motorcycles and maybe she will one day share my same passion. If that’s not the case, I’d love if the motorcycle club I’m president of, U.S. Leonessa 1993, will take care of my collection.

Do you have any suggestions for a weekend in Brescia? Also for motorcycles enthusiasts?

Brescia has so much to offer even if it’s less mentioned and popular than other close cities, but we have a lot to offer, like the Castle and Mille Miglia museum in old town. We’re really close with motorsports here that even the headquarters of my motorcycle club is inside the Mille Miglia museum, with the only motorcycle shown being my BMW Fatichi that Bruno Birbes used at Paris-Dakar. I’m going to suggest a beautiful trail on Garda Lake, that starts at Tremosine and is considered one of the most beautiful roads in the world, the Forra road.

For lunch instead the tavern at Mille Miglia is perfect, not much sophisticated but on brand for bikers, where the food marries the passion for motorcycles.

Stefano Vertua

The motorcyclist with a passion for tractors

27.02.2021

When and why did you start collecting?

I started collecting thanks to my grandfather who had old Landini tractors and some Moto Guzzi. I’ve always loved the idea of playing with machines so the passion for motors started early. For motorcycles the passion started with my grandpa carrying me on his moped and at 14 I finally bought my first motorcycle which was an Airone.

 

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle?

At the moment, no. Maybe I’ll gift one to my children when the time is right

 

The collector, even though mainly collects for himself, has a social role?

Yes, it has to convey memories of the past. I think it has a social role for sure.

 

Tell us something about your Landini tractors collection. How did it start?

It was born with the memory of my grandfather who had a L25. I started documenting with a local journalist and put together a list of 12 models from 1931 to 1957 and with time, started buying them.

 

Does your collection include memorabilia?

Yes, I have tins, models, photographs and such.

 

Do you collect other goods besides tractors and motorcycles?

I have a series of 1931 Balilla tractors. I am in love with tractors and motorcycles!

 

To which motorcycle are you most connected to and why?

I’d say the Moto Guzzi 1924 Sport 14, which was my cousin’s motorcycle.

 

In your opinion, which is the most beautiful motorcycle ever built?

For sentimental reason I love Moto Guzzi, but there’s other Indian and Harley-Davidson models that I like. There’s also a motorcycle owned by an architect in Manerba, a magnificent 1920 Indian 750.

 

If you had to buy a new-construction motorcycle, which one would it be?

I’m sorry, there isn’t one I’d buy.

 

Are there any experts or magazines that you consult to fine your choices?

There’s an expert in Modena to whom I talk to often and I’m subscribed to ‘Motociclismo d’epoca’. The rest of the information I find it on the internet, for example on the page of restorer Carlo Loperfido.

 

Which role do you think it has a motorcycle collection in the current socio-economic context?

I never really thought about it but I really appreciate the questions and the interest my children show every time I come home with another motorcycle.

 

In your opinion, a ‘beautiful and unattainable’ motorcycle?

I think the Moto Guzzi 707, which is very distinctive since the sidecar is behind the motorcycle and not obviously on the side.

 

An adjective or phrase to describe your collection?

Wonderful

 

Where will your collection pass to when you’re gone?

I hope to my children.

 

Do you have any motorcycle trails to suggest?

Other than the classic tour of Lago di Garda, there’s various itineraries in the Colline Moreniche which include many Bed & Breakfasts and trattorie on the road.

Daniele Pescali

Blue Wasp

05.05.2021

When and why did you start collecting?
We have to go back a few years because everything started in Milan when I was 16 with my first
Malaguti 50 HF I used to go to school, although my passion for motors come from way back in the
family, so I was born in it. My first motorcycle was heavily modified, as one does, and then I
bought my first Vespa at 18, which started my 30-year-long collecting of Vespas. However, that
model is known for its aesthetic and not its speed, so I started to look for other models like the
Honda NSR125, the firsts Ducati, Yamaha TZR 125 and many of these motorcycles I bought at the
time are still in my possession. So yes, the passion started and continued during the years in my
around-the-globe travels to find my next motorcycle.

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle? If yes, which one and to whom?
No, I never gifted motorcycles.

Does the collector, even if collects mainly for himself/herself, has a social role?
Yes, absolutely. The motorcycle has an important social role, through rallies, gatherings, trades
and fairs and in every moment a social moment can be created.

Does your collection include memorabilia?
Yes, but mainly Piaggio-related items.

Do you only collect motorcycles?
No. Motorcycles, cars and some art but that’s it.

To which motorcycle are you most attached and why?
Surely my blue Vespa 50cc I used to use at 16. Then a Honda 900 from the 70s because it really
reminds me of my dad on this motorcycle when younger.

In your opinion, what’s the best motorcycle ever built?
The Vespa 98 because is the model that became iconic around the globe. Another beautiful Vespa
is the Sei Giorni, that I deem marvelous. Sadly, there’s many of beautiful motorcycles and it
becomes a problem when you want to have them all!

If you had to buy a new-production motorcycle, which one would you choose?
I’m a Ducati enthusiast, so I would say the new Ducati Panigale, absolutely.

A ‘beautiful and unattainable’ motorcycle you wish you had?
I’d like to have some MotoGP motorcycles, but only to keep there and appreciate them. To see
what they’re able to do during the Grand Prix that seems to defy the law of physics makes them
examples of incredible beauty.

An adjective or phrase you would use to define your collection?
Crazy. I’d say crazy because there’s a bit of everything, mainly focused on Vespas, but there’s
many models of different use and times.

Do you like to show your collection or are you jealous of it?
Partly I’m jealous, but to those very close to me I’d gladly show it.

What kind of care do you reserve to your motorcycles?
Obsessive. I also have someone whose job is the care of the motorcycles for every day of the year.

How much of your free, or non-free, time do you spend with your collection?
Very little time unfortunately. During the summer I generally have more time and since I keep my
collection in a maritime area so during vacation with the family, we get to use them a little. Very
little since I’m jealous and afraid of breakage.

Where will your collection go when you’re gone?
It will absolutely go to my children.

How would you describe your collecting philosophy to five-year-old kid?
As I would when describing it do my children, 11 and 8. I try to remain focused on the technique
rather that the beauty and the value because I don’t want it to go over to their heads, so they
commit to earn the motorcycles through hard work and when obtained also care for them, always
staying playful obviously.

A motorcycle trail you would like to suggest?
I’m not actually a big motorcycle rider, I’m more passionate about the object in itself. But I had the
chance to do the Gumball 3000 in the USA by car, which without taking anything from the
European views was spectacular for the diverse landscape, starting from New York and ending in
Los Angeles.

Do you have something you would like to add to our conversation?
I really like your initiative, in my opinion it’s necessary because as is today the car market a
widespread good, so is the motorcycle market. There are extremely beautiful examples, other
important and other historically relevant ones.

Matteo Pettinari

HONDA Rider

05.05.2021

Something about Matteo Pettinari: I’ve been doing asset consultations for many years to Italian
families, a job difficult to explain since I am a lawyer but I also deal with matters outside of my
legal work.

When and why did you start collecting?
I started collecting for a very practical reasons, since because of my total technical and
administrative inability to manage a motorcycle, an expert taught me the basics and this
knowledge then encouraged the purchase of many different motorcycles I otherwise wouldn’t
have bought.

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle? If yes, which one?
Not a motorcycle. I’ve gifted a car, twice, but never a motorcycle.

Do you think the collector, even if collecting mainly for himself/herself, has a social role?
It surely does. It has to do with the historical memory, of images and goods for example. The
collector always has existed in human history and it testifies to the innate goal of people to keep
knowledge of past elements that with time acquire different meaning and importance depending
to who reads it.

Does your collection include memorabilia?
No, I only collect motorcycles.

To which motorcycle are you most connected to and why?
Surely the Honda RC30, which represents the best I could hope for at 16-17.

In your opinion, which one is the most beautiful motorcycle ever built?
It’s very difficult to answer because it depends on when this question is asked. Right now, I’d say
the Honda NSR 125, but maybe my answer will be different in five years.

If you had to buy a new-production motorcycle, which one would you choose?
I’d probably orient myself towards those motorcycles once called enduro, a model that can go on
rough terrains.

In your opinion, what role can a motorcycle collection have in the current socio-economic
climate?

A motorcycle collection has the same problems and prerogatives of an art collection. So, there’s
not the collecting as an absolute but there’s principles and common threads that can be about a

specific brand, artist or epochs. Collecting expresses the idea of the one who does it compared to
the need to pass on a series of essentially invisible and aesthetic concepts. Surely collecting is a
personal way to represent the past so it has an essential social role.

A ‘beautiful and unattainable’ motorcycle you want in your collection?
Beautiful but not unattainable is the Yamaha FZR 1000, the first in white, red and blue. Not
impossible but also not easy to find in optimal condition.

How did your collection evolve through time?
On the base of a very simple principle: most of the examples were bought because they found me.
Meaning that in some cases the motorcycles were very tough to find, meanwhile in all the other
cases there was the very casual chance to buy them.

An adjective or phrase you would use to describe your collection?
Very colorful.

Where will your collection go when you’re gone?
I actually never thought about it, but I’d probably give it to another collector.

Do you like showing your motorcycles or are you jealous of them?
I’m not jealous but I am not keen on showing or share them.

What kind of care do you have for your collection?
None. Even with the knowledge given to me, I can’t start most of the bikes, let alone do the
necessary maintenance.

What percentage of your free time, or non-free, do you spend with your collection?
One to three hours a week.

If you had to explain your collecting philosophy to a five-year-old, how would you do it?
It would be easy to understand for the kid because it’s the same logic with which kept his toys
when he was three. If he remembers of when he was three and had all of this toys which he really
liked and even though he didn’t use them all he kept them just to enjoy them, then he
understands that it is the same thing.

Describe the ideal collector using three adjectives.
My ideal collector is a person who loves aesthetics and shapes, because for me motorcycles have
to be stunning and colorful. Secondly, a collector isn’t connected to a single historical period
because motorcycles are beautiful at any age, and isn’t connected to prejudice towards brands

and model that may seem without technical value but in the collective conscience of a society,
even a small one, holds powerful meaning. Like the Paninari phenomenon in Milano, which
majorly influenced the sale of the Zündapp 125. In an ideal collector there’s surely an
heterogeneity and multiculturalism I’d love to see.

What are the necessary things to become a worldly collector? Is passion enough or you need
something else?

No, passion is not enough because these are objects that need to be valuated even before the
purchase, initially trying to identify color, period and model. Then you’d need assistance because
obviously motorcycles are beautiful if original, functioning etc. Overcome this phase, besides the
obligation to insure, there’s the management of the administrative process of the purchase, after
which there’s the physical and practical management, like where to put them, and then where to
keep and maintain them. There are many necessary elements to be a collector.

Are there any experts you consult when needed?
Yes, to me it’s absolutely necessary since I have no technical expertise.

If your collection could talk, what would it say about you?
That I’m extremely nostalgic. I hope that sooner or later Netflix after the movie ‘Lo Spietato’ will
make a movie set in the 90s in order to lend the collection.

Do you have any motorcycle trails you would suggest?
As De André says: ‘People who can’t set the bad example give good advice’, so take a trip in
Scotland under the pouring rain and eating badly but enjoy the beautiful views.

Loris Gosetto

THE DRIVER

8.06.2021

How was your passion for motorcycles born?

I loved motorcycles from a very young age, I was driving before I was 14. It’s in my blood.

Were you inspired from family traditions or was it your choice?

No, it was my choice. I started with my beloved Vespa and through time I chose various classic motorcycles

When and why did you start collecting?

In the 90s, i started with a Moto Guzzi Super Alce Ex Militare.

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle? If yes, to whom?

I gifted a Lambretta 50 to a friend, a Vespa 50 to my godson and a Piaggio Ciao to my niece.

How would you describe your collecting philosophy to a 5-year-old kid?

I think he knows; he loves and collects toy soldiers and when you grow up you swap toys with motorcycles.

Do you think the collector, even if collecting mainly for himself/herself, has a social role in the current socio-economic scenery?

Nowadays i think this role is fading away because, by the little experience I have, long ago older people mostly collected because they lived through the golden eras of motorcycle manufacturers and now that they’re sadly dead their collections are being sold away, so much so that classic motorcycles market is declining for this very same reason.

Does your collection include memorabilia?

No, it’s too resource-intensive.

Do you only collect motorcycles?

I also have two classic cars, a 1961 Beetle and an Alfa Romeo GT Junior.

To which motorcycle are you most connected, and why?

I’d probably say the Vespa because it’s my very first model I had with which I spent almost all of my time when young. It’s been years since I’ve ridden it but I’ve lived with it for a very long time in my life. It brings up cherished memories, as well all my other motorcycles, that other than collecting I also use to go around.

In your opinion, which one is the most beautiful motorcycle ever built?

God, I wouldn’t know what to say since every time i see a motorcycle is more beautiful than the last one. Maybe i get more excited when i see motorcycles such as Vincents and MV Agustas.

If you had to buy a new-production motorcycle, which one would you choose?

I already own a BMW GS, so I would like to stay on the same style of motorcycle.

A beautiful and unattainable motorcycle you would love to have in your collection?

I have no idea, i don’t know what to say since every bike is beautiful!

An adjective or phrase you would use to describe your collection?

Fun.

Where will your collection go when you’re gone?Dove andrà la sua collezione quando non ci sarà più?

Good question. I’d hope it goes to my nieces and nephews, but they seemed more enthusiastic when they were younger, so we’ll see.

How has your collection evolved in time?

My collection shrunk over the years because I moved house and the new one didn’t have enough space, so I had to let go of some motorcycles. It was very varied and with time it became smaller and smaller because I get to use them rarely.

Are you jealous of your motorcycles or do you enjoy showing them off?

I love to show them to my friend so they can also appreciate them.

What kind of care do you reserve to your motorcycles?

Lately, and I’m very ashamed saying it, the care is lacking. I generally keep them clean, covered and when time allows it, I do the necessary maintenance, even though is very difficult to look after every motorcycle consistently.

What percentage of your free time do you dedicate to your collection?

Depends on the time of the year. Surely more time in the summer than winter.

Is there something you would like to add to our conversation?

The only thing I would like to say is that I’m happy there’s people with your dedication in developing this project including the shared passion of motorcycle with many other people.

A motorcycle trail you would like to suggest? Comprehensive of restaurant and hotel.

Since I live near the Dolomites, eastern Italian Alps, the only trail I could suggest is coming here and going through all passes you can. Abitando vicino alle Dolomiti, l’unico percorso che posso consigliare é venire qua e fare tutti i passi che riesci a fare. If you want to eat you can stop wherever you want, and you’ll always eat good.

ENRICO BONETTI

BLACK BMW

31.08.2021

How was your passion for motorcycles born?

I’ve always been mainly interested in classic cars but 10 years ago, since I’ve been always denied the chance to buy a motorcycle from my parents I decided to rebel and bought until today more than 20 BMWs, the first a 1928 model and the last one from 1978.

Was your collecting inspired from someone or was it your choice?

It was a personal choice, but the BMW brand always fascinated me: the black, the business, the detailing.

Is there a date, a moment or a motorcycle that started it all?

I started off with a 1970s R100 to also use it every day. It was so new and beautiful that this gentleman, also a collector, wanted it for himself so he bought it. Through the years meeting other collectors and enthusiasts I expanded my collection, with some special motorcycles included passed on to me, like a baton.

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle?

Not yet.

How would you explain your collecting philosophy to a 5-year-old?

I’d explain first the story of every motorcycle since each one is largely documented. I’d then talk and explain the emotions that motorcycles transmit.

Does your collection include memorabilia?

Yes, I have some items. I mostly have a lot of documents that represent the history of the motorcycles.

Do you only collect motorcycles?

I started collecting classic cars as a kid.

In your opinion, which one is the most beautiful motorcycle ever built?

I really love Vincents.

If you had to buy a new-production motorcycle, which one would it be?

The MV Agusta Veloce.

A ‘beautiful and unattainable’ motorcycle you wish you had in your collection?

The ruler of all motorcycles is the Brough Superior.

A word you would use to describe your collection?

Dark.

Where will your collection go when you’re not here anymore?

Unknown. I hope to pass on to someone who shares my same passion.

How did your collection evolve through the years?

I always loved the BMW 51/3, which is in my opinion a very elegant model. I started with that, buying a four-motorcycles-collection from an elder gentleman.

Do you like to share your motorcycles or are you jealous?

No absolutely, I enjoy sharing.

How much time of your free time, or non-free, do you dedicate to your collection?

It requires quite a lot of time if you want to keep them in a certain state. At least once a month I start them, do the appropriate maintenance, and clean them.

A motorcycle trail you would suggest in the area?

I have my club, Fuoriserie, and we organize motorcycles and cars events with food and wine tours in the Franciacorta territory. On the clubs Facebook page there’s records

 Is there something you would like to add to our conversation?

I’m very happy in seeing someone carry on this passion of the travels.

ENRICO FARINA

THE ENDURO DRIVER

7.09.2021

How was your passion for motorcycles born?

It started when I was young, a passion passed down from my father which could only manage to build some Audax motorcycles since he’s from a generation that endured the war and was in a concentration camp, and then just gradually stopped. I was enchanted and as soon as I could at 14, I participated in my first cross competition with an Aspes Navaho and since then the passion stayed, of cars included.

 

 

Could you identify the moment you started collecting?

The collecting started in 1989 when I bought a 1966 Herkules 125, which wasn’t my very first motorcycle, but it was my first one for regularity.

 

 

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle? If yes, which one?

I gifted a motorcycle and a car to my dad. The motorcycle was a SWM Sachs, and the car was a Mercedes 190.

 

 

If you had to explain your collecting philosophy to a 5-year-old, how would you describe it?

I’d start by trying to convey the passion by physically exploring the motorcycles, I think that by living in a workshop he will understand.

 

 

The collector, even though mainly collects for himself/herself, has a social role?

Yes, I think so because unknowingly, even if people stare at and don’t get you and you say that it makes you happy, it becomes a spreader of various interests and information.

 

 

Does your collection include memorabilia?

Yes, because collecting it’s not only motorbikes but also comprises innumerable objects that are not physical motorcycles.

 

 

Do you only collect motorcycles?

I also collect books, photographs, and vintage sports equipment.

 

 

Is there a motorcycle you are more connected to?

Emotionally is the Italjet Trail 50 because it was my first ‘fifty’ that I used to ride to school to.

 

 

In your opinion, which one is the most beautiful motorcycle ever built?

The first that comes to mind is the Moto Guzzi V7 Sport.

 

If you had to buy a new-production motorcycle, which one would you choose?

Tough question, but I think I would buy an Indian.

 

 

A ‘beautiful and unattainable’ motorcycle you would like to have in your collection?

The Honda NR 500 Grand Prix that used oval pistons.

 

 

An adjective or phrase you would use to describe your collection?

Spiny.

 

 

Where will your collection go when you’re not here anymore?

I exercise my right to refuse to answer.

 

 

Is there a specific way your collection evolved through time?

I like to do the exchange, because when you attribute a value to the motorcycle in most cases is difficult to find someone else that thinks the way you do. So, when a motorcycle which cost 5000 euros to restore is being offered only 1500 euros to buy it becomes unnerving. If you can’t find people who care the adequate culture, I’d think is best to avoid exchanges.

 

 

Do you like to show your motorcycles or are you jealous?

It depends on who it is.

 

 

What amount of free, or non-free, time do you reserve for your collection?

A lot of time because happily in the last years I have a lot of time, but they must be functioning well even though non every motorcycle has been restored.

 

 

A motorcycle trail you would like to suggest?

Here in Brianza we have many paths you can ride, in combination with the ferry and some hidden gems. Near Bellagio there’s this place called Da Gaetan, that requires early booking, where you can eat local and traditional food. As accommodation I would go to the Hotel Fossati because of the history it holds.

 

 

Is there something you would like to add to this conversation?

I’d like to say that at this moment the collecting world has been static, since competitions have destroyed the antique world by continuously producing vehicles. In my opinion, we should find a way for people that have real, beautiful, and correct motorcycles to be able to take them out, because if not every motorcycle in competitions is modified.

 

GIANGAELAZZO RAPAZZINI

THE ACCOUNTANT

11.10.2021

How was your passion born?

I’d say I was a late bloomer because at 14 and 16 years old I bought a Vespa, but my father strictly prohibited the use. At 18 I bought the Fiat 500 Giardiniera and started to use my first motorcycle, a VeloSolex, to go at work in Milan. It lasted few years with many incredible difficulties when raining because of a part that made the front wheel slide away. Afterwards I bought another Vespa and the first BMW at 28. It started growing from there.


 Was it your choice to collect or were you inspired by external factors?

It definitely wasn’t a family affair because you couldn’t even mention motorcycle collecting. My mom started changing a bit her mind when later in life she started collecting books, but nothing relating to motors.

 

Was there a moment that defined the beginning of your collection?

No, non really. I started with motorcycles in a more committed way when my wife was expecting our first child and I began to buy motorcycles for a single person rather than two-persons models.

It went growing there, from a couple of British models alongside my only moto I used to move around. My collecting started recently, about 8 years ago, when I started to buy older classic examples.

  

Have you ever gifted a motorcycle? 

If yes, which one and to whom.

I gifted ‘half’ a motorcycle for educational purposes to my daughter, who decided to buy the rest of the motorcycle by herself, which was a Husqvarna Svartpilen, a great model aesthetically.

It’s a motorcycle she uses regularly and often she comes with me on long rides.

  

How would you describe your collecting philosophy to a 5-year-old?

I think I wouldn’t talk about collecting because I think sometimes it has a maniacal function. I’d talk about aesthetic, therefore being able to grasp beauty.

  

In your opinion does the collector, even though mainly collects for himself, have a social function in this socio-economic environment?

The important collector yes, but it must be a patron. In the sense you can’t make money out of collecting without getting to really higher levels. Either way in the social logic it is to preserve something, beautiful or ugly, that has a certain story and that allows to be conserved.

 

Does your collection include memorabilia?

No.

  

Do you collect only motorcycles or other items too?

I have difficulty in identifying as a collector. I am more of a user. I have very few motorcycles to be effectively a collector but way too many for a ‘normal’ person, but all of my motorcycles are being used.

  

To which motorcycle are you most connected and why?

I can’t respond because if I discover a motorcycle that I love the most then I’ll find out which one I love the least and I would feel like selling it to buy another one.

  

In your opinion, which one is the most beautiful motorcycle ever built?

You put me in a bad position here because every era has its absolute legends.

If I were truly forced to choose, I’d say the Moto Guzzi 8-cylinder.

 

If you had to buy a new-construction motorcycle, which one would you choose?

The one I already own: the MV Agusta Superveloce.

  

A beautiful and unattainable’ motorcycle you would love to have in your collection?

A Vincent would be the dream.

  

An adjective or phrase to describe your collection?

The usability is its raison d’être.

  

Where will your collection go when you’re not here anymore?

I hope my children will use them. Right now, two out of three ride motorcycles.

 

How has your collection evolved through time?

Per the expression we use here in Italy: the opportunity makes the man a thief. Either way there’s a common thread between the 60s and 70s, where the motorcycle reaches the essential aesthetic.

  

Do you like to show your motorcycles or are you jealous of them?

No I enjoy it. If possible, I let people drive them.

  

What kind of care do you reserve to your motorcycles?

A manic care sounds excessive, but I am really careful. I spend a lot of time with my motorcycles also because in order to be usable I have to run them regularly.

  

Describe with an adjective your figure as a motorcycle user?

Lucky man who can enjoy what he has.


Is there anything you would like to add to this conversation?

I can start but then we would lose ourselves in a thousand chit-chats.


A motorcycle trail you would suggest to take?

I’d recommend is the Targa Florio route in Sicily, which I strongly advise because still today it’s a perfectly rideable road with around extraordinary scenery.

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